JOURNEY CAKES

Recipe Name:
Category: 18TH CENTURY
Serves: 12

SOURCE	FELICITY'S COOK BOOK - AMERICAN GIRL COLLECTION       

2 Tblsp Butter
1 Cup Water
1 Cup Cornmeal, yellow
1/2 Tsp. Salt
1/2 Tsp. Sugar
1/2 Cup Milk
Butter, to grease skillet
Apple Butter, honey, or syrup (optional)

Heat the water and butter in a saucepan over medium high heat until boiling.
While the water and butter are boiling, put the cornmeal, salt, and sugar into a mixing bowl.
Pour the boiling butter, water mixture into the mixing bowl. Add the milk and stir the batter until it is well mixed.
Grease the skillet with butter. Then heat over medium-low heat.
Drop 6 spoonfuls of batter into the skillet. Let the cakes cook about 5 minutes, until they are golden brown. Turn the cakes over and let cook for another 5 minutes. Remove from skillet and keep warm if to be eaten while hot. Drop a spoonfull of butter into the skillet and let melt. Tilt the skillet to coat with melted butter. Cook the remainder of the cakes following the above method until all batter is used up. When the cakes are cooked, serve with the applebutter, honey, or syrup.
If not to be used right away, cool and store in a dry, cool place. These cakes travel well for several days un-refrigerated.

Journey Cake

(CHUCK WAGON VITTLES)

The early colonists learned from the native Indians how to parch and mill corn, mix it with boiling water and bake it in to thin cakes. Used by pioneers, hunters and traders, it was originally called, “Journey Cake.” Cowboys and their ‘Cookies’ on the open range, naturally adopted the corn bread (Journey Cake) recipes as a practical part of their diet. There are as many corn bread recipes as there are ‘Cookies.’ If you like a real hearty, Dutch oven, corn bread (as in bread) and not a cake (as in sweet and crumbly), this recipe ranks among the best. It also bakes well in a stove oven, in a 12-inch cast iron fryin pan (skillet). Cut in to 10 or 12 pieces or use a cast iron muffin or corn stick pan. This dates back to the West Texas, Keenan Klan, about 1895.

Put two eggs in a pan
Add two cups of fresh buttermilk. That is maybe if you can
Or substitute the sour milk mix With just a little vinegar
Be careful not to over sour Maybe just a half a jigger.
Now put two teaspoons of soda
And a half of cup of flour
Dump in two cups of corn meal
You’ll eat within an hour
Two teaspoons of baking powder
And a teaspoon of salt
Then toss in a teaspoon of sugar
Or hear about the fault
Now to tease them tasty taste buds
A quarter o’cup of shortenin
But much tastier yet is bacon grease
It’s a heart attack yer courtin!
First beat the eggs before you mix
Mix smooth and heat the skillet
Fill the pan about an inch and half
Be careful not to over fill it
Pour that mixture in a 12-inch pan
Be sure to grease the bottom
Figger about 25 minutes at 450
And now there you gottum!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Journey Cake

Ingredients:
2 1/2 lbs flour
4 tablespoons baking powder
1 tablespoon salt
1/2 lb shortening
2 cups coconut milk
1 egg

Instructions:
Put flour into a bowl and add all the dry ingredients.
Beat the egg and milk, and stir.
Pour the liquid slowly until mixture forms a smooth paste.
Make dough into balls and flatten them.
Prick centers with fork.
Bake at 350 degrees for about 15 minutes.

This recipe will not hold up on the trail due to the eggs, early journey cake recipes contained no eggs.

Sorry Shadows -

We disagree on recipes - it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know that early cowboys did not have portable refrigerators to haul around with them in their covered wagons!

But that doesn’t mean that they never had eggs!

If you don’t like my recipes - then don’t read them. You are NOT and authority on everything. As a matter of fact - here is an ORIGINAL Johnny Cake recipe and a few others - and THIS is how they were made on the trail!!!

Bannock or Frying Pan Bread

1 cup flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1/4 tsp. salt
Water

Thoroughly mix dry ingredients. Add just enough cold water to make a stiff dough. Working dough as little as possible, form a l-inch thick cake. Lay the cake on a greased, pre-warmed skillet. Brown the bottom of the cake lightly and flip or turn with a spatula to brown the other side. When both sides are lightly browned, prop the skillet in front of the fire and let it bake. Test for doneness by thumping the cake with a spoon handle or stick. A hollow ringing sound indicates doneness. An alternative test is to jab the cake with a twig or matchstick. If the twig comes out clean (no clinging dough), the cake is done.

Hoecakes or Johnnycakes

1 cup white cornmeal
1/2 cup flour (optional)
1/2 tsp. salt
Water

Combine the dry ingredients and mix well. The flour is optional, but it will improve the texture of the cake. Add just enough cold water to make a stiff batter. Drop large spoonfuls of batter onto a lightly greased skillet and cook slowly.

Ash Cakes

1 cup white cornmeal
1/2 cup flour (optional)
1/2 tsp. salt
Water

Mix dry ingredients. Add enough cold water to make a firm dough. Form the dough into thin cakes. Clear coals from an area of the campfire and lay the cakes on the hot earth. Rake coals and ash over the cakes and let them bake for about five minutes. Test for doneness by thumping the cake with a spoon handle or stick. A hollow ringing sound indicates doneness.

Thin skinned arn’t we?

If opinions and reviews are not allowed on this site you should say so in big bold letters.

I am a student of history and historical recipes I know my recipes that I say are historical are just that, sorry you don’t think so, each to their own!

You’re the thin-skinned one - not me.

I don’t give a hoot what you are studying - it is of no interest to me.

And you can study all you want till hell freezes over - and that will does not make you an authority on the subject!

So keep studying - real hard.

You keep forgetting that this site is for sharing recipes - not shredding another’s recipes. You seem to have a problem with that for some time now. This is a great site - we don’t need someone to try to ruin it for others. No two people on this site will see eye to eye on everything - that is what makes this site unique. That is why we share recipes. The members here have something in common - sharing recipes and ideas.

99% or more of the members and users of this site don’t give a hoot where recipes have “originated” from.

Maybe you should start your own site - that way you can entertain yourself with the “origin” of recipes.

And any member of this site is allowed to post a recipe after anyone else’s post! That is called SHARING RECIPES. I wonder when you will start to understand that??

So stop playing “teacher and/or authority” and put your red pencil away - it won’t work on this site.

You have no right trying to correct anyone’s recipes - here or on any other site. If that is your goal - start your own site.

[quote=“Kitchen Witch”]Sorry Shadows -

We disagree on recipes - it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know that early cowboys did not have portable refrigerators to haul around with them in their covered wagons!

But that doesn’t mean that they never had eggs!

If you don’t like my recipes - then don’t read them. You are NOT and authority on everything. As a matter of fact - here is an ORIGINAL Johnny Cake recipe and a few others - and THIS is how they were made on the trail!!!" end quote

Bannock or fry bread was not the same as Journey cakes not in anyones cookbook. Sorry if you disagree with me but there is no need to be vicious just because I don’t agree with you.

I never said that Ash Cakes and Bannock or Fry Bread was a Johnny Cake
and you have no right telling me that I did!

It was the fact that those recipes were old chuckwagon recipes but of course - you cannot see into anything like that.

Remember - this is a site for SHARING RECIPES!! When are you going to learn that???